Mørstadstølen Cultural Heritage

  • Photo: Katharina Sparstad

  • Photo: Kulturhistorisk Museum

  • Photo: Katharina Sparstad

Essential info

  • Destination Valdres
  • Season January–December

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About Mørstadstølen

The long, narrow lakes in Vinstra watershed form a natural road over the mountain between the east and the west. For thousands of years, hunters have hunted deer and moose who were migrating between summer and winter pastures up here. The oldest discoveries were made by Mørstadstølen where there have been found thick layers of bone waste from thousands of years of hunting. A settlement and a tomb are uncovered. Approximately 500 a.c, a person was buried at the tip of the cape at Mørstadstølen. The dead had been joined by 12 arrowheads, two knives, a spearhead, a pair of scissors and a skin scrape. The hunter with his weapons and tools was put into a small circle of stone. The stone circle was buried in the remains of a settlement from the Mesolithic. In addition to the unique historical timeline, the meadows at Mørstadstølen contain a particularly rich biodiversity of endangered grassland plants like field gentian, moonwort and mountain moonwort. Nearby, on the weather-beaten noses in the east end of Vinstervannet, traces of settlements which are up to 8500 years old have been found. Large amounts of bone waste show that the people who lived here in the Mesolithic times used to hunt reindeer that moved across the strait between Bygdin and Vinstervannet between summer and winter. North and south of Vinstervannetseveral pitfalls ad traps which tell about the protrated hunting of big game in the area can be found. Getting there: Neset at Mørstadstølen is easily accessible along Jotunheimvegen which runs along the northern side of Vinstervannet. From Jotunheimvegen a private road offers access down to Mørstadstølene. Video: http://www.nrk.no/video/PS*169411

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